by Cathy Baker

{ Day 24 } 

“I drove away from my mind everything capable of spoiling the sense of the presence of God. I just make it my business to persevere in His holy presence. My soul has had an habitual, silent, secret conversation with God.” -Brother Lawrence

The habitual, silent, secret conversation is a stealth weapon residing in the soul of a believer, wielding power with but one breath. 

In the month of Nisan in the twentieth year of King Artaxerxes, when wine was brought for him, I took the wine and gave it to the king. I had not been sad in his presence before, so the king asked me, “Why does your face look so sad when you are not ill? This can be nothing but sadness of heart.”

I was very much afraid, but I said to the king, “May the king live forever! Why should my face not look sad when the city where my ancestors are buried lies in ruins, and its gates have been destroyed by fire?”

The king said to me, “What is it you want?”

Then I prayed to the God of heaven, 
and I answered the king…”
Nehemiah 2:1-5a

Nehemiah inhales prayer and exhales action. A “breath” prayer, if you will.

Nehemiah valued his relationship with God, so he spent time with Him—talking, asking, and most importantly, listening. This foundation of prayer released a current of godly wisdom and discernment that could be drawn from at a moment’s notice.  

When in constant communion with God, breath prayers rise as natural as a chest drawing in air.

In 2013, I wrote the brief post Befriending, Not Depending, On Breath Prayers for it’s the habit of prayer that empowers the silent, secret conversation with God, not the other way around. 

Staying in Step with the Spirit: Prayer ushers us immediately into the presence of a holy God and loving Father. No greater way of staying in step with Him exists.

Heavenly Father, thank You for the privilege of prayer. Please forgive us when we say we love You with our lips but don’t reflect it in our actions, beginning with prayer. Help us to grasp the magnitude of Your goodness and holiness as we reflect on this costly privilege.

Is there some way I can pray for you today? I would count it a privilege.