Garden Bench

Dirt beneath the nails is a badge of honor in my family.

Back in the ’40s, my great-grandmother, Fannie Reece, was known for her dinner plate-sized dahlias. She lived in a mill town where houses circled the block. Behind the houses was a field where her flowers grew. From Grandmother Reece’s back stoop, the top of the field was quite steep, accessible only by large field stones carved into the landscape.

I remember climbing those stones as a young girl. Dahlias and chrysanthemums of all colors and sizes spread across the land like a brightly-colored quilt.

Grandmother Reece must’ve handed down her green thumb to my grandmother, Elsie Knighton. On the window sills of her back porch, plants lined up with torn pieces of tin-foil cupping the bottoms to prevent spillage onto the corn-colored linoleum floors.

And my other grandmother, Alberta Scott, was a charter member of her local Garden Club. Large southern Gardenia shrubs lined one side of her home. Their perfumed petals welcomed guests long before MaMa had time to greet them at the door with a smile and a full-on hug.

MaMa (Alberta Scott, on far left) with two of her best friends and fellow Garden Club Members, Reba Crow and Catherine Edwards, (whom I was named after!)

 

But there’s more to gardening than the size of a flower or the perfume it carries.

 

God could’ve chosen to place man anywhere and He chose a garden.

 

When I catch a whiff of fragrant shrubs or touch the red clay of the Carolinas, I feel an undeniable tug toward heaven, and it’s for this reason I wrote A Tiny Prayer Garden for new subscribers. Creating a prayer garden doesn’t have to be fancy, cost a lot of money, or sap our last ounce of energy. It’s simply an intentional place to meet with God among His glory-filled creation.

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Tiny Prayer Garden

The introduction to A Tiny Prayer Garden:

 

Now the LORD God had planted a garden in the east, in Eden; and there he put the man he had formed. Genesis 2:8 NIV

“It’s no coincidence that life began in a garden. 
Trees invite us to find respite beneath their branches, the scent of flowers lingers mid-air, and the choruses of birds praise their Maker. If you feel at home in a garden, it’s not surprising, because, in a way, you are.

My grandmother was a charter member of her local Garden Club. Growing up, I spent a lot of time in her enamel-clad kitchen. A journal decorated in flowers sat on her smooth speckled kitchen counter by the stove. On the cover was written: 

“One is nearer to God’s heart in a garden than anywhere else on earth.” – Dorothy Frances Gurney

To create a prayer garden is to set apart a quiet place for you to meet with God. The moment you step outside, your senses engage, inviting you to enter a quiet, thoughtful place. God meets with you in the garden, or anywhere else. He is only a breath away. 

But there is something to be said for creating a place to talk with, and listen to, God.

So, why a tiny prayer garden? 

Because many today are choosing to live on a smaller scale whether through downsizing, minimizing, or simplifying. Regardless of where we live, most of us long for a small, private, and dare I say, manageable, place to step away from the hectic culture in order to embrace the quiet. 
And in doing so, we’re in good company.

After He had sent the crowds away, He went up on the mountain by Himself to pray; and when it was evening, He was there alone. Matthew 14:23


When a prayer garden is kept tiny, it simplifies everything— the design, required tools, time and energy. It’s possible to create a meaningful place for soul refreshment without depleting your resources. 
Prayer gardens can be simple, elaborate, or anything in between. There’s no right or wrong. They can also vary in size because the word tiny is subjective.

It’s not about a space in the yard, but rather, a place in the heart that brings the prayer garden to life. 
And finally, you’ll find sensory tips at the bottom of each section. Planning with your senses in mind adds a layer of thoughtfulness that you’re sure to appreciate for years to come.”

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In addition to A Tiny Prayer Garden, you’ll also find a bundle of six popular downloads under the NEW Freebies Tab that’s available to new members of the *tiny* community.

Freebie Bundle for Subscribers

But if you’re not ready to join us, that’s okay. There’s still something for you on the Freebies page. 🙂

So what does it mean to become a part of our community? It simply means that you support the ministry of the work that’s shared here @ the Tiny House on the Hill. Not financially, but through prayer, engagement on the blog, and an excitement to share the posts with others in hopes of offering them hope and encouragement.

Members of the THOTH community receive 2-3 blog posts in their inbox each month and a Monthly Letter that includes:

  • Behind-the-scenes pictures/videos of our progress on the tiny house.
  • First-to-know updates on my books and other happenings at the house.
  • First notifications and glimpses of new releases, like A Tiny Prayer Garden.
  • Helpful downloads and links created exclusively for subscribers
  • And a fun monthly giveaway.

What’s not to love? *smile*

Do you have a garden, or plan to have one in the future? Or do you remember a garden from your past? I’d love to hear about it!

Thank you for taking the time to stop by for a visit at the Tiny House on the Hill.

 

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