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When Prayer Becomes a Powerful Foe

A prayer-filled friend is a powerful foe—not to the befriended—but to the father of lies, the deceiver, the sly one.

The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective. James 5:16

I
recently met with Kay, a godly mentor of twenty years. I’d not seen her in awhile but during an extended time of prayer the week before, I sensed God prompting me to ask her to meet me. I’d been on a roller coaster ride for six months, and trust me, there were no Mickey ears in sight.

I knew from the moment our meeting was penned on her calendar Kay would begin praying, but I was especially humbled to learn how on that morning, she covered us in prayer from 5:00-6:15 a.m.

After returning home, I phoned another friend who was aware of my meeting with Kay. Before I could share all God had accomplished, she said God woke her up at 4:30 a.m. to begin praying. 

An unspeakable appreciation swelled in my spirit as I thanked God for these friends, and those like them who I know would drop everything, wake up early, or stay up late to pray on behalf of others. 

God used my prayer-filled friends to wield the weapon of truth in the face of my enemy that morning and life took a different direction as a result. Prayer-filled friends are incredibly powerful foes, which is why we so desperately need each other in the battle. I plan to share more about my non-Mickey roller coaster ride in the near future, but until then, please know this:

Prayer-filled people are not perfect people. They are, however, people who know who they are in Christ, have a clear understanding of Who they are praying to, and have faith that God has the power to accomplish His desires for those being lifted before His throne of grace. Prayer-filled people also tend to repent quickly and find deep abiding joy in their community with other Christ-followers. 

Is there any doubt why James tells us that their prayers – those who are “right” before God – are powerful and effective? 

Let us appreciate our prayer-filled friends — but may we also seek to be one ourselves.
 

“Prayer strikes the winning blow; service is
simply picking up the pieces.”  S.D. Gordon



“I would rather teach one man to pray than ten men to
preach.”  Charles Spurgeon





Why I’m Removing the Word Just From My Prayers

Lord, I just pray that… 
Lord, I pray that You would just

The word just crept into my prayer vocabulary without much notice—but now, when spoken, it becomes as obvious as the three earsplitting screeches heard when the Emergency Broadcast System conducts their weekly test, no doubt during a favorite show.

After all, consider the definition:
Just: adv [dʒʌst (unstressed) dʒəst] no more than; merely

My prayers were actually saying: “Lord, I merely pray that…” 

As Christ-followers we’re given freedom to pray for all things (from the smallest of desires to the deepest of struggles.) Our prayers, however, are not ushered into the presence of One who desires to do “just enough” in the lives of His people. 

Perhaps there’s no one word in your prayer life that triggers such a thought, but have you considered that you too may be asking God for just enough of something instead of praying in expectation for God to do something amazing? 

The prayer of a righteous person has great power as it is working. 
James 5:16

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