I’ve loved small spaces for as long as I can remember.

The secluded corner in my backyard where wild violets grew, my aunt’s 16′ Bambi Airstream, the treehouse coop by the lake, and the edge of my grandmother’s concrete back steps where I baked magnificent mud pies if I do say so myself.

I recall the first time I spotted a tiny house on HGTV in 2013. It would become the catalyst for countless tiny dreams along the way.

As an adult, I designed tiny spaces in my backyard framing them with picket fences and fragrant shrubs. And then there was Buttercup, the 62 Shasta that Brian surprised me with upon returning from the Blue Ridge Mountains Christians Writers Conference in 2015. It was downright dreamy!

Shasta Buttercup

That is until we tried spending the night in it for the first time. Let’s just say my asthma kicked into high gear and we were forced to sell it. Sigh. But the dream continued!

When we moved to the country in 2016 I scouted for spots on our 3-1/2 acres where a tiny house could perch just so⏤you know, with a full-on view of the mountains. Recently, while perusing tiny houses on the Internet {because that’s what I do *wink*}, I came across this image:

 

Victorian Tiny House

Photo Credits: Trevor Tondro for The New York Times

 

On the fly, I showed it to Brian at the risk of having the white from his eyes blind me as they rolled back in his head.

 

But without hesitation, he said, “I could build that for you.”

 

I can’t say for sure, but I think I heard the hallelujah chorus play in the background. And just when I thought the dream-come-true couldn’t get any dreamier, my dad offered to lend a hand when we begin building this spring. Family time, fresh air, and the scent of lumber. What more could a girl ask for?

It turns out, I’m not alone in the desire to step away from the distractions.

 

Most of us think of a tiny house as a place to free ourselves from debt, from want, and from material burdens. Perhaps just as important is their ability to free the mind. You’re probably familiar with Thoreau, who sought refuge in a tiny wooded sanctuary to reflect on the nature of simple living. He wasn’t alone in his approach, and in fact, plenty of famous writers built tiny secluded structures to escape distraction and let their creative juices flow. – Tinyhousefor.us

 

I’m excited to see what the Lord will create during my time in the tiny house, as well as other writers who will join me!

 

Unlike the brave, beautiful {and debt-free} souls who live in their tiny homes full-time, I will use our tiny house as an office. Stay tuned as I plan to share more about that, along with its unique features, in future posts called Tiny Tuesdays {every second Tuesday of the month.}

In addition, I hope you’ll enjoy a new column, Tiny Tidbits, in our monthly newsletter. Not a subscriber? No problem! It’s easy. Simply add your email to the sidebar and voila! {You can unsubscribe at any time.} The newsletter is the go-to place for behind-the-scenes on my books in progress, relevant links, and a monthly giveaway that always adds a spark of fun! As a new subscriber, you’ll also receive my e-book, Praying in Every Room of Your Home as my gift to you. Thank you!

Mostly though, you’ll find our new Tiny House journey on Instagram. If you’re not already following me there, please do @cathysbaker #lilredwritinghouse. The #lilredwritinghouse will host an 8′ desk with an expansive window facing the mountains, along with a couple of other unique features. Nope, the house itself won’t be red⏤but that’s where the fun begins!

Bonus: Check out the Tiny House page Susan Stilwell designed for me here. {If your blog could use a little spiffing up, click the Fistbump Media button in the sidebar for more information!}

So, what one thing would you be sure to include in your tiny house?

 

 

Here’s the Tiny House Blog post on the Victorian house above if you’d like to see inside pictures!

To see famous writer’s retreats, check out this post @ tinyhousefor.us.

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